Dental FAQ

What is Dentistry?

Dentistry is the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of conditions, disorders, and diseases of the teeth, gums, mouth, and jaw. Often considered necessary for complete oral health, dentistry can have an impact on the health of your entire body.

Who is a Dentist?

A dentist is a doctor who works to diagnose, treat, and prevent oral health problems. Your dentist has completed at least eight years of schooling, and received either a DDS (Doctor of Dental Surgery) degree, or a DMD (Doctor of Dental Medicine) degree

Why is Visiting the Dentist So Important?

Visiting the dentist regularly will not only help keep your teeth and mouth healthy, but will also help keep the rest of your body healthy.

My Teeth Feel Fine. Do I Still Need to See a Dentist?

Your teeth may feel fine, but it’s still important to see the dentist regularly because problems can exist without your knowledge.

What is a Cavity?

A cavity is an infection, bacterial in origin, that causes demineralization and destruction of the hard tissues of the teeth. (Enamel, dentin, and cementum). Cavities are formed when plaque builds up on the outside of the tooth, combines with sugars and starches in the food you eat. This produces an acid that can eat away the enamel on your tooth. If a cavity is left untreated, it can lead to more serious oral health problems. Cavities can be prevented by remembering to brush your teeth at least three times a day and floss between your teeth at least once a day.

What is a Filling?

A filling is a synthetic material that your dentist uses to fill a cavity after all of the tooth decay has been removed.

What is Gum Disease?

Also known as periodontal disease, gum disease is mostly caused by plaque and bacteria buildup that is not treated in its early stage. Other causes of periodontal disease include tobacco use, teeth grinding, some medications, and genetics. Gingivitis is the beginning stage of gum disease, and, if detected, is treatable. Gingivitis left untreated may turn into gum disease. Advanced gum disease will lead to tooth and bone loss, and is a permanent condition. Brushing your teeth regularly and visiting the dentist every six months will help prevent gingivitis and more severe cases of periodontal disease. Common signs of gum disease:
• Red, irritated, bleeding, or swollen gums
• Chronic bad breath
• Loose teeth, or loss of teeth
• Extreme tooth sensitivity
• Receding gum line
• Abscessed teeth